Organic Ground Beef. Just what does that mean? A recent trip to my fav - Costco - got me thinking about this.

Many economy-minded families (like ours) are finding creative, healthier ways to incorporate lean, ground beef in to their dinner menus. So, when I saw this nicely packaged, organic option it made me wonder: why organic beef. And is it worth it?

Let's start with the very basic. What does "USDA Organic" beef actually mean? According to the USDA website, it means a "product has been produced through approved methods that integrate cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used."

Okay...

So, for beef, what does that mean? Let's dig a little deeper...

"As for organic meat, regulations require that animals are raised in living conditions accomodating their natural behaviors (like the ability to graze on pasture), fed 100-percent organic feed and forage, and not administered antibiotics or hormones," says the USDA website blog.

Ah, ha! Now I see!

So, for $5 pound - $1 more per pound than the non-organic meat for sale right next to it - I can support a farmer who allows his herd to graze naturally, feeds them organic feed and doesn't use antibiotics or hormones.

But, you say, $5/pound for ground beef - even if 85-percent lean - is a lot!

I agree. But now when you make that choice, you have a better understanding as to why it is 25-percent more than its non-organic counterpart...

How does it taste? Honestly, it tastes the same as regular-ol-beef. But after reading about the process, I think I will be buying more of it.

Remember, it's not about making every step green. It's about feeling good about every green step you take!

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What organic items do you insist on in your kitchen? What items do you buy only when convenient? Please share!

As for organic meat, regulations require that animals are raised in living conditions accommodating their natural behaviors (like the ability to graze on pasture), fed 100% organic feed and forage, and not administered antibiotics or hormones. - See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2012/03/22/organic-101-what-the-usda-organic-label-means/#sthash.jGpHeJ6X.dpuf
As for organic meat, regulations require that animals are raised in living conditions accommodating their natural behaviors (like the ability to graze on pasture), fed 100% organic feed and forage, and not administered antibiotics or hormones. - See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2012/03/22/organic-101-what-the-usda-organic-label-means/#sthash.jGpHeJ6X.dpuf
regulations require that animals are raised in living conditions accommodating their natural behaviors (like the ability to graze on pasture), fed 100% organic feed and forage, and not administered antibiotics or hormones. - See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2012/03/22/organic-101-what-the-usda-organic-label-means/#sthash.jGpHeJ6X.dpuf